Art Break: Studio Snapshot with Aracely Scott

Mike MeyerSeptember 2018
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Hello Sparrow Studiophoto by Angelina Aragon
The comfortable hominess of Hello Sparrow Studio in Peoria, run by mixed-media artist Aracely Scott, belies Scott’s once-grim journey of endurance. After thyroid cancer necessitated an arduous and near-silencing thyroidectomy, Scott used YouTube, Etsy and her own personal connections to launch her art career. “I thought, ‘I am 51 years old and just got through cancer. What do I have to lose?’” she says. “I just made 30 pieces and opened my Esty shop, and after about a year my business started to pick up.” Using paper, fabric, paints and other crafty materials, Scott creates canvases featuring sayings and quaint images like pumpkins and barns. Her art and studio are built as conveyances of inspiration and warmth, she says. “I want it [all] to be encouraging and fun and whimsical.” Find her work at etsy.com/shop/HelloSparrowStudio and at Woods & Whites in Arrowhead Towne Center.

Scott has begun her largest canvas yet – 16 inches by 20 inches – featuring a barn. “Every time I do a barn, they sell out within minutes on my Instagram. I love doing trendy things and rustic things.”

Hello Sparrow Studio is anchored by two large wooden desks. “I picked them up at World Market. I love having this big space in the center to handle all the mess.”

She keeps a cache of tools including knives, brushes and art pens. “You get a totally different effect with a palette knife than a paintbrush, though I love using both.”

Scott always has a plethora of paper. “I love paper, and I love to mix different patterns that don’t necessarily match. Paper is a big aspect of my art and about it being the unexpected.”

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