Phoenix events Archives

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Celebrate Fall at a Not-so-Spooky Pumpkin Festival Fairmont Scottsdale Princess marks the spookiest time of year with its festive Pumpkin Nights, through Oct. 31. Highlights include a pumpkin patch; a multiacre labyrinth hay maze; amusement rides, fireworks on select nights and a bounty of German beers and seasonal foods at the resort’s Plaza Bar and restaurants. 6-10 p.m. Tickets start at $18. Fairmont Scottsdale Princess, 7575 E. Princess Dr., Scottsdale, 480-585-4848, scottsdaleprincess.com/pumpkin-fest. Get Your Taco Fix...

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Drive Among the Dinos More than 70 photorealistic dinosaurs return from extinction at the Jurassic Quest Drive Thru, which continues through Sept. 5. The experience is complete with lifelike dinosaurs, a baby dino, trainer meet-and-greets, photo opportunities and an audio soundtrack to help navigate the herd and learn little-known dino facts. Animatronic creatures are displayed in realistic scenes that allow guests to experience them roaring and moving as they drive through the 60-minute tour. Thursday,...

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Storytelling is a form of artistic expression where a performer steps up to a mic and tells an honest, personal story. One of the most well-known storytelling groups, The Moth, hosts these live events in over 29 cities across the U.S., bringing these stories to the stage and into the spotlight. I was first introduced to storytelling while reporting on Chatterbox, a small storytelling group that met every Wednesday at Fair Trade Cafe in Downtown...

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The “OCD” in The OCD Festival stands not for the common mental disorder, but rather for “Outstanding Cinematic Delights.” So, at least, claims organizer Suzanne Steinberg.

The festival’s title, says Steinberg, “is meant to confront negative stereotypes of mental illness. It is taking something negative such as a label and trying to associate it with something positive, such as a great film festival. The hope is that the message behind the festival says that people impacted by mental health are still beautiful, wonderful people who deserve to be a part of and cared for by our society.”

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