Tuesday, March 31, 2015

valleyNews

 

Bad Medicine

Even after high-profile tragedies, a silent epidemic of prescription drug overprescription, abuse and overdose continues to plague Arizona. 

It was a syringe full of medicine that plunged her down the rabbit hole, and medicine that kept her there, dragging her deeper into a hinterland of darkness, till she could barely remember the woman she once was – or, really, anything at all. 

 

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Pregnant Pause

A rash of discrimination cases raises the question: How well does Arizona protect its pregnant workers?


Stacey Smith was mystified when her work hours were abruptly docked at Tutor Time in Queen Creek. The Mesa resident says she received glowing reports from both customers and colleagues at the daycare

 

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Bach to the Future

A new wave of Beethoven-blasting devotees labors to resurrect classical music’s cool factor.

Mention “classical music concert” to someone and you’ll likely conjure images of a grand symphony hall packed with discerning men in monocles and women wrapped in mink shawls. 

 

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A Sun-Roof Over His Head

Steve May made waves as a brash Arizona lawmaker. Now the pseudo-homeless pol’s a vagabond advocate for minority groups.

When former Arizona congressman Steve May announced on Facebook last September that he was shuffling off his possessions and calling his Cadillac Escalade home, many of his 4,700-plus friends freaked out, offering their couches, carports and condolences.
But May says the plan – dubbed “DWNSIZE,” after the vanity plate on his Escalade – was entirely by design. “I did DWNSIZE for many reasons, none of them out of necessity,” May says. “It has been a learning experience for me.”

 

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¶lim¶Cloud City

How now, brown cloud? As State agencies struggle to clean up the harmful pollution that hangs over the Phoenix skyline, the recent rash of haboobs stirs up even more trouble. — why won’t the brown cloud just blow away?

 

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¶lim¶Survivor: Arizona

Every day people venture into Arizona’s wilderness ill-equipped to contend with its dangers. So we asked two “survivormen” to school us in the art of staying alive in mettle-testing scenarios, from wandering alone in the desert without water to fending off hypothermia to encountering the venomous fangs of a rattler. It’s everything you always wanted to know about edible twigs and dung-befouled water, but were afraid to ask.

 

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Military Spotlight

During World War II, the remote western Arizona desert proved an ideal place for the U.S. Army to test a bizarre weapon designed to blind and baffle the enemy. Camp Bouse was a top secret base established in 1943 as part of the California-Arizona Maneuver Area to prepare tanks and troops for the war in Europe. Commanded by General George Patton, the base accommodated 5,000 soldiers and was

 

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