Sunday, January 25, 2015

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¶lim¶Super Bowl Fan Guide

PHM 500x500 FPOKick off your Super Bowl experience with our guide to events, activities and parties pinned to the big game on February 1.

Verizon Super Bowl Central
Located in Downtown Phoenix, Verizon Super Bowl Central is the week-long, pedestrian-only epicenter of Super Bowl entertainment in the Valley. Find concerts and food, plus the NFL Experience, an interactive theme park with games, clinics and NFL autograph sessions. Visit azsuperbowl.com for more information.

Dates: January 28 – February 1
Hours: 2 p.m.-Midnight

Daily Schedule
2 p.m. Food and beer gardens, Sponsor Activity Zone, Autograph Stage and XLIX Concert Stage open
2–6 p.m. Local talent and group performances on Concert Stage
6 p.m. Autograph Stage closes
7–10 p.m. Regional and national music artists on Concert Stage
10–10:10 p.m. Nightly fireworks show
10 p.m. Activities close
Midnight Food and beverage close (Friday and Saturday)

 

Read more: ¶lim¶Super Bowl Fan Guide

Local Libros

PHM0115Flash-1-LocalLibroTurn a new page with books by Arizona authors.

Arizona’s never had a shortage of talented scribes. Zane Grey, Erma Bombeck, Edward Abbey and Diana Gabaldon are just a few of the literary standouts who searched our canyon landscapes and desert streets for the muse of inspiration. Here are a few rising Arizona wordsmiths to consider for your winter reading.

 

Read more: Local Libros

Wine and Dine

PHM0115Flash-1-WineDineMix and mingle with chefs and wine pros at Valley wine-pairing dinners.

“I don't care how much you know about wine – there’s always something new to learn. Food, too.” Chef Anthony DeMuro of Different Pointe of View at the Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs has learned a lot about both in the last four years during the restaurant’s Insider’s View Dinner Series, which pairs visiting winemakers’ vintages with DeMuro’s AAA Four Diamond cuisine. “It’s a passionate evening,” DeMuro says. “They’re a blast. It’s quite the experience.” There are pop-up wine dinners aplenty in the Valley, but these three stand out for their location, consistency and, of course, point of view.

 

Read more: Wine and Dine

¶lim¶Saintly Stockers

Long ridiculed and misunderstood by outsiders, the Mormon practice of emergency food storage remains a central part of the LDS lifestyle – and gains wider secular acceptance in the prepper era.

Phoenix resident Andra Riegel has enough food stored to feed her and her husband – and any number of her seven grown children who pop in from time to time – for a full year.

 

Read more: ¶lim¶Saintly Stockers

Roast Hunters

PHM 500x500 FPOBack in 1979, Ric and Judy Brecheisen traveled to Europe and drove around in a Volkswagen bus with their children, stopping at coffeehouses across the continent to try new brews. That flavorful family vacation led to a family-run business when the joe-inspired Brecheisens returned to the Valley and founded Passport Coffee & Tea in Scottsdale in 1983.

 

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¶lim¶Café, Coffee, Joe?

PHM 500x500 FPOPour-overs, brew bars and local roasters – coffee has experienced a delicious evolution in the last decade. Discover new frontiers of caffeinated ecstasy with our guide to all that’s coffee in the Valley.

Coffee. Most Americans can’t get through the day without at least a cup – 58 percent of consumers age 18 and older drink it daily, according to a 2012 survey by the Specialty Coffee Association of America. Coffee has become more than a daily wake-up ritual or a jolt to the system during afternoon slumps. Its consumption has moved into the domain of wine, fine spirits, craft beer and gourmet food, with baristas being elevated to artisans and a cup of coffee telling a story about where it grew, how it got to you and the personality of who roasted it and who brewed it. It’s no longer liquid energy to mindlessly swill – it’s an experience to be evaluated, with flavor and aroma profiles and brewing skills, and, of course, enjoyed.

 

Read more: ¶lim¶Café, Coffee, Joe?

Salt of the Hearth

PHM 500x500 FPOHow to make meats and veggies sizzle on Himalayan salt slabs.

What if we told you that you could cook just about anything on a big, pink slab of 900-degrees-hot Himalayan salt? Cooking with salt slabs is more like an art than it is cooking; the salt is absorbed into whatever is sizzling on the slab, so there’s no need for seasoning beyond a sprinkling of pepper. Intrigued? Chef Jacques Qualin of J&G Steakhouse at The Phoenician, who has been a chef in both Paris and New York, showed us everything from how to heat the slab to how to obtain the perfect salty crust on an entrée.

 

Read more: Salt of the Hearth

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