Saturday, September 20, 2014

health fitnessBlog

 

Curl Up and Diet

Amid legions of diet books promoting every manner of metabolic gimmickry and self-torture, Martin Cizmar’s new book Chubster: A Hipster’s Guide to Losing Weight While Staying Cool ($13.95, Mariner Books) stands out. Cizmar states in the prologue that he is firmly against “the horrors of Organized Dieting,” particularly its incompatibility with the hipster lifestyle of restaurant touring, copious lattes, microbrews and solitary standing at concerts. 

 

Read more: Curl Up and Diet

McDowell Sonoran Preserve Hiking & Bell Pass

HIKE OF THE MONTH
For a good workout and amazing views close to suburbia, try Bell Pass Trail. Although there are many access points and loop options, here’s one that works well if all you want to do is an out-and-back hike to the Pass. 

From the trailhead on 104th Street, head north on the closed road for 0.2 miles to the Levee Trail junction. Turn right (east) and go 1 mile to the Paradise Trail junction. Go left (north) on the Paradise Trail for 0.2 miles to the Gateway Loop junction. Turn right (east) and follow Gateway Loop for 0.2 miles to the Bell Pass Trail turnoff. From here, it’s 2 miles to the Pass.

 

Read more: McDowell Sonoran Preserve Hiking & Bell Pass

Drive and Hike

Heading out on a fabulous fall drive? Check out our guide to the best autumnal ambles in the area.

Near Sedona

Bear Sign Trail No. 59
The remote upper reaches of Bear Sign Trail host surprisingly rich woodlands of deciduous trees that transform into a canopy of color in early autumn. To find these hidden thickets, hike on the juniper- and scrub-lined Dry Creek Trail to the Bear Sign junction, veer left and pick up the trail heading uphill. Much of the path parallels boulder-filled ravines lined with sycamore, willows and cottonwoods eking out a living where water collects among gigantic boulders. Throughout the hike, haphazard webs of canyon grape vines sprawl in viral abundance, forming veils of diffused sunlight. 

 

Read more: Drive and Hike

Drive and Hike (2)

Heading out on a fabulous fall drive? Check out our guide to the best autumnal ambles in the area.

Near Sedona

Bear Sign Trail No. 59
The remote upper reaches of Bear Sign Trail host surprisingly rich woodlands of deciduous trees that transform into a canopy of color in early autumn. To find these hidden thickets, hike on the juniper- and scrub-lined Dry Creek Trail to the Bear Sign junction, veer left and pick up the trail heading uphill. Much of the path parallels boulder-filled ravines lined with sycamore, willows and cottonwoods eking out a living where water collects among gigantic boulders. Throughout the hike, haphazard webs of canyon grape vines sprawl in viral abundance, forming veils of diffused sunlight. 

 

Read more: Drive and Hike (2)

Fall Hiking Guide: Flagstaff

HIKE RATING SYSTEM

Easy - These trails are simple to follow, short in length and don’t require a lot of physical stamina. If you’re a regular walker, you should be able to hike an easy trail.

Moderate - Mid-range in length and elevation change, moderate trails are more challenging to follow and may have segments that require heavy physical exertion.

Difficult - Only experienced hikers with good equipment and solid outdoor survival skills should attempt difficult trails.

 

Read more: Fall Hiking Guide: Flagstaff

HealthFooterAd728x90