Friday, August 01, 2014

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¶lim¶2014 Top Dentists

PHM0814Feat-3Open up and say “ah.” Our 12th annual guide to the Valley’s best dentists features 171 peer-selected practitioners in nine specialties, including a new category: TMJ and orofacial pain.

Choosing the Top Dentists
Every spring, PHOENIX magazine mails 1,600 surveys to randomly selected dentists throughout the Valley. The survey asks the dentists to write the names of three dentists whom they deem the best in each of nine specialties. They mail the surveys back to us, and we tally the votes in each category. Once the top vote-getters are determined, we obtain the dentists’ contact information from the Arizona State Board of Dental Examiners, and our fact-checkers verify their information.

PHOENIX magazine does not give any preference to dentists who advertise. The Top Dentists are determined purely based on the number of votes they receive. Our sales staff does not see the list until the magazine is printed; if there are instances when a dentist on the list also has an ad in the magazine, it is merely coincidence. With the exception of the five randomly chosen dentists profiled, the dentists also have no advance knowledge of whether they made the list.

 

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¶lim¶21 Cool Staycations

PHM0814STAYC02ULTIMATE RESORT AND STAYCATION GUIDE

The summer is in full swing, and it’s time to face facts: You’re not making it to Paris this year. Don’t despair! Grab a smokin' resort deal for a splashy and splendid in-town escape.

 

MOST TRANSPORTIVE STAYCATION
The Boulders

34631 N. Tom Darlington Dr., Carefree,
480-488-9009, theboulders.com

Want to feel like you’re vacationing in another part of the world, without the hassle of baggage fees and TSA pat-downs? The Boulders is your jam. Artfully integrated into the Black Mountain foothills of Carefree, the sprawling Waldorf Astoria property feels like an alien hybrid version of Phoenix, with spectacular fairways framed by towering saguaros and multi-ton desert granite, and elegant chaparral flats between the casitas and footpaths. The pièce de résistance: a mountain of russet boulders overlooking the main lobby and pool, shielding guests from both the late afternoon sun and any visual evidence of the metro beyond. It’s like getting away from it all, without going away.

 

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¶lim¶2014 Hot Neighborhoods

PHM0814NHOODS01After two years of double-digit gains, Phoenix Metro home values have leveled off in 2014. Still a good time to buy? Experts say yes, but buyers need to be savvy. For your consideration: 10 Valley neighborhoods to watch. Bonus: Tips and insights from real estate pros at all levels of the game.

Median Metro home value (May 2014) - $195,100

Projected one-year average increase in home values. If your home appreciates
more than this percentage by May 2015,
you’re ahead of the curve. - 6.9%

Source: Zillow

 

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¶lim¶How the West Was Won

PHM0714Feat-3Museum maestro Mike Fox was looking for a hand to get the long-planned Scottsdale’s Museum of the West into the saddle. He found one in the mysterious "Mr. C."

Thirty years ago, then-mayor of Scottsdale Herb Drinkwater would take Michael J. Fox – no, not that Michael J. Fox – out in his Jeep to look at property to the north of downtown Scottsdale, “which, to the north then, was like Shea Boulevard,” Fox remembers. As director of the Heard Museum, and a guy who’d launched art institutions in Berkeley and in Flagstaff, Fox was known as a development whiz. Meanwhile, Drinkwater was enamored with the idea of developing a museum dedicated to the art and history of the American West, and wanted to share his vision with Fox.

 

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¶lim¶Arizona Country Roads

PHM0714Feat-2From the White Mountains to Willcox, Duane Eddy to Dierks Bentley, we take a journey through the Western music of the Grand Canyon State.

If you took a tour bus and filled it with all the musicians who helped make the history of Arizona country music remarkable, you’d see several familiar faces: Rex Allen. Marty Robbins. Tanya Tucker. Waylon Jennings. But you’d also discover a few forgotten folks, like Billie Maxwell, a cowgirl who cut the first commercial record by an Arizonan in 1929. And if you drove to just a few of the places around the state wrapped in Western lore and connected to country music, you’d be making a long C-shaped drive spanning almost 268 miles, from the Petrified National Forest to near the Mexico border.

 

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¶lim¶101 Things to Do in Arizona

PHMT2DO01You shook Goldwater’s hand. You hiked Humphreys Peak. You even installed your own backyard misting system. But your Arizona membership dues aren't current until you tap our definitive list of uniquely AZ-centric events and experiences, from primeval chimichangas to the state's most exclusive river hike.

Photography by Jim David, Diana Elizabeth, Mirelle Inglefield, Mark Lipczynski, Craig Outhier, Brandon Sullivan.

Adventures in Dining
Drinking Destinations
Go Country - A Transformation in Seven Steps
Beat the Heat
Bucket List for a Kid
Musical Musts
Avian Encounters
Literary Getaways
Bonus Getaway

 

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Reader Photo Contest

For our fourth annual reader photo contest, titled “Elemental,” you submitted stunning shots of Arizona in all its earthen, blustery, rust-hued glory. We selected the top 10, and our readers voted for their favorite.

 

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